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Maple Path: An In-Depth Look

Friday, January 12, 2018

I went to Japan over Thanksgiving to explore the famous fall colors in Kyoto.  The mountains surrounding the city are full of Buddhist temples with incredible gardens and maple trees.  My favorite part of Kyoto was Arashiyama Park, home to several beautiful temples and wide, expansive grounds of natural beauty.

I perceive trees to be the people of the landscape.  Each tree is unique and has its own spiritual personality.  I love capturing their graceful bows and ever-changing pattern of leaves with my paint brush.



The painting "Maple Path" captures a scene from Sogenchi Garden, at the Tenryu-ji Temple. You can see the world-famous bamboo grove in the background behind the maple trees. It was interesting how the different maple trees changed color at different rates. There would be one maple with every single leaf a bright cadmium-yellow, and several feet away would be a maple with a whole rainbow of hues from yellow to purple... and yet further down the walk would be a maple clothed exclusively in brilliant oranges and reds.

The brush strokes in "Maple Path" are loose and impressionistic, conveying a sense of movement within the painting. When you see the painting in person, you can experience the thick texture of the paint and lustrous sheen of the oil color.

The painting will be framed in a gilded floater frame, to set off the colors in the piece. Here is a digital "in-room mockup" of the painting, so you can get a sense of the painting's dimensions:

Maple Path
Oil on canvas, 48 x 71 inches


I hope you enjoyed the in-depth look!

Sincerely,
Erin Hanson



 

ERIN HANSON has been painting in oils since she was 8 years old. As a young artist, she worked at a mural studio creating 40-foot-tall paintings on canvas, while selling art commissions on the side. After getting a degree in Bioengineering from UC Berkeley, Erin became a rock climber at Red Rock Canyon, Nevada. Inspired by the colorful scenery she was climbing, she decided to paint one painting every week for the rest of her life. She has stuck to that decision ever since, becoming one of the most prolific artists in history. Erin Hanson's style is known as "Open Impressionism" and is now taught in art schools worldwide. With thousands of collectors eagerly anticipating her work and millions of followers online, Hanson has become an iconic, driving force in the rebirth of contemporary impressionism.
 

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